brentbs:

dolola:

Too ridiculous

Too ridiculously awesome.

brentbs:

dolola:

Too ridiculous

Too ridiculously awesome.

(Source: baconbroderick, via bluishorange)

(Source: buttpoems, via hellbox)

My brother Bob makes these awesome, film-based animated GIFs, which he calls Wigglegrams. Now he’s launched a Kickstarter to help support this analog-to-4D photography endeavor. Mostly he needs a way to get around the shitty state of commercial film printing and scanning.
Watch the amazing video. Enjoy the n2 pledge levels. Back Bob and help him make the promise of an Animated GIF art show a reality.

My brother Bob makes these awesome, film-based animated GIFs, which he calls Wigglegrams. Now he’s launched a Kickstarter to help support this analog-to-4D photography endeavor. Mostly he needs a way to get around the shitty state of commercial film printing and scanning.

Watch the amazing video. Enjoy the n2 pledge levels. Back Bob and help him make the promise of an Animated GIF art show a reality.

pzlr:

Happy Pi Day. Just another chance to point out that this exists.

pzlr:

Happy Pi Day. Just another chance to point out that this exists.

If there were a museum of terrible self-help ideas, the new years resolution would have its own wing. I mean, in a nut, if new years resolutions worked, you wouldn’t need them. The problem with new years resolutions, setting aside the drunk-in-a-paper-hat part, is that people get frustrated because they have all this enthusiasm to say, ‘Oh, the calendar’s changing so I should be different!’ And we commit, or half-commit, to some kind of outlandish change to ourselves. And most of us, in my experience, end up failing miserably and feeling worse than when we started. Which if you do that for enough years becomes a kind of rehearsal where the real habit you’re building is sucking. You’re building the habit of unrealistic expectations you can never live up to, and then being really great at sucking at them faster and faster every year until you’ve got a big scrotum of anger.

— Merlin Mann (via maxistentialist)

I’ve had the Scrotum of Anger at Kuma’s — it’s pretty good, but knocks you out for the rest of the week.

(via maxistentialist)

pzlr:

descentintotyranny:

Computer pioneer Alan Turing pardoned
Punished under British law for homosexuality in the 1950s, code breaker Turing has now been pardoned.
Dec. 24 2013
Queen Elizabeth II has pardoned  Alan Turing, the father of modern computing, who was convicted of “gross indecency” for being gay, 61 years after he poisoned himself.
The Queen granted Turing, whose theories laid the foundation for the computer age and who broke the code which helped the Allies outfox the Nazis, an official pardon on Tuesday.
Turing, whose work on artificial intelligence still informs the debate over whether machines can think, was punished by Britain in the 1950s, when homosexuality was still a criminal offence.
"Turing was an exceptional man with a brilliant mind," Justice Secretary Chris Grayling said in a prepared statement released on Tuesday.
Describing Turing’s treatment as unjust, Grayling said the code breaker “deserves to be remembered and recognised for his fantastic contribution to the war effort and his legacy to science.”
Turing’s contributions to science spanned several disciplines, but he is perhaps best remembered as the architect of the effort to crack the Enigma code, the cypher used by Nazi Germany to secure its military communications.
Turing’s groundbreaking work, combined with the effort of cryptanalysts at Bletchley Park, near Oxford, and the capture of Nazi code books, gave the Allies the edge across half the globe, helping them defeat the Italians in the Mediterranean, beat back the Germans in Africa and escape enemy submarines in the Atlantic.
Even before the war, Turing was formulating ideas that would underpin modern computing, ideas which matured into a fascination with artificial intelligence and the notion that machines would someday challenge the minds of man.
When the war ended, Turing went to work programming some of the world’s first computers, drawing up  one of the earliest chess games,  among other initiatives.
Turing made no secret of his sexuality, and being gay could easily lead to prosecution in post-war Britain.
In 1952, Turing was convicted of “gross indecency” over his relationship with another man, and he was stripped of his security clearance, subjected to monitoring by British authorities, and forced to take estrogen to neutralise his sex drive - a process described by some as chemical castration.
S. Barry Cooper, a University of Leeds mathematician who has written about Turing’s work, said future generations would struggle to understand the code breaker’s treatment.
"You take one of your greatest scientists, and you invade his body with hormones," he said in a telephone interview. "It was a national failure."
Turing committed suicide in 1954.
Turing’s legacy was long obscured by secrecy.
"Even his mother wasn’t allowed to know what he’d done," Cooper said.
Then-Prime Minister Gordon Brown issued an apology for Turing’s treatment in 2009, but campaigners kept pressing for a formal pardon.


About time.

Hard to believe this hadn’t happened yet.

pzlr:

descentintotyranny:

Computer pioneer Alan Turing pardoned

Punished under British law for homosexuality in the 1950s, code breaker Turing has now been pardoned.

Dec. 24 2013

Queen Elizabeth II has pardoned  Alan Turing, the father of modern computing, who was convicted of “gross indecency” for being gay, 61 years after he poisoned himself.

The Queen granted Turing, whose theories laid the foundation for the computer age and who broke the code which helped the Allies outfox the Nazis, an official pardon on Tuesday.

Turing, whose work on artificial intelligence still informs the debate over whether machines can think, was punished by Britain in the 1950s, when homosexuality was still a criminal offence.

"Turing was an exceptional man with a brilliant mind," Justice Secretary Chris Grayling said in a prepared statement released on Tuesday.

Describing Turing’s treatment as unjust, Grayling said the code breaker “deserves to be remembered and recognised for his fantastic contribution to the war effort and his legacy to science.”

Turing’s contributions to science spanned several disciplines, but he is perhaps best remembered as the architect of the effort to crack the Enigma code, the cypher used by Nazi Germany to secure its military communications.

Turing’s groundbreaking work, combined with the effort of cryptanalysts at Bletchley Park, near Oxford, and the capture of Nazi code books, gave the Allies the edge across half the globe, helping them defeat the Italians in the Mediterranean, beat back the Germans in Africa and escape enemy submarines in the Atlantic.

Even before the war, Turing was formulating ideas that would underpin modern computing, ideas which matured into a fascination with artificial intelligence and the notion that machines would someday challenge the minds of man.

When the war ended, Turing went to work programming some of the world’s first computers, drawing up  one of the earliest chess games,  among other initiatives.

Turing made no secret of his sexuality, and being gay could easily lead to prosecution in post-war Britain.

In 1952, Turing was convicted of “gross indecency” over his relationship with another man, and he was stripped of his security clearance, subjected to monitoring by British authorities, and forced to take estrogen to neutralise his sex drive - a process described by some as chemical castration.

S. Barry Cooper, a University of Leeds mathematician who has written about Turing’s work, said future generations would struggle to understand the code breaker’s treatment.

"You take one of your greatest scientists, and you invade his body with hormones," he said in a telephone interview. "It was a national failure."

Turing committed suicide in 1954.

Turing’s legacy was long obscured by secrecy.

"Even his mother wasn’t allowed to know what he’d done," Cooper said.

Then-Prime Minister Gordon Brown issued an apology for Turing’s treatment in 2009, but campaigners kept pressing for a formal pardon.

About time.

Hard to believe this hadn’t happened yet.

Rita Leistner on her first experience photographing war using an iPhone and Hipstamatic:

Buick and Dorshorst and the programmers they work with are like the “new chemists” in the equation of the once mechanical art, names in a lineage that includes Talbot, Daguerre and Nicéphore Niépce. The effect of the app is so much a part of the final image, that it makes sense to me to credit the developers in the images’ by-lines.

(via Rita Leistner: Looking for Marshall McLuhan in Afghanistan — BagNews)

Rita Leistner on her first experience photographing war using an iPhone and Hipstamatic:

Buick and Dorshorst and the programmers they work with are like the “new chemists” in the equation of the once mechanical art, names in a lineage that includes Talbot, Daguerre and Nicéphore Niépce. The effect of the app is so much a part of the final image, that it makes sense to me to credit the developers in the images’ by-lines.

(via Rita Leistner: Looking for Marshall McLuhan in Afghanistan — BagNews)

charminglyantiquated:

One Halloween my sister stayed home to pass out candy and she told each kid they could take one piece and leave or sing and dance and take a handful. So some did things like twinkle twinkle little star and one or two did a weird little jig thing


and then this one kid went through the entire Bohemian Rhapsody, word-perfect and she just tipped the entire bowl of candy into his bag and locked the door.

God I wish I had a house so I could do things like this.

(via bluishorange)

Please let’s make this into a thing people say.

Please let’s make this into a thing people say.

Happy 20th, In Utero

bornyet:

image Nirvana’s In Utero turns 20 today, and in honor of its birthday, all new BornYet accounts are 20% off. Instead of the normal $10, you can get one for $8. Just today.

Special bonus: if you were in Nirvana (or are Steve Albini), you can get one for free. Just email me.

My entree into the shady world of questionable tie-in marketing.

Playtest: Dungeon Roll

playtested:

Let’s get this out of the way: Dungeon Roll is a solitaire game. It says on the tin that it’s suitable for 1-4 players, but with more than two you’ll be checking Twitter while your opponents do their thing. Even when playing head-to-head, the only activity you have to do while waiting for your…

Matthew and Max asked me to review Dungeon Roll for their game blog. It’s not my favorite game, but it’s got some neat elements. If you need a solitaire game to play between game nights, this is a great contender.

Let's get 'fetonym' in the dictionary

bornyet:

fetonym: (n.) The name you give your baby while it’s in utero.

I was surprised to find that I had made this term up. This was back in 2009 when Sarah and I were first pregnant and named our fetus Perquackey. We were talking about the names we give our fetuses with other pregnant friends, and…

It just makes sense, people.

Puzzle #103: Words From Home

pzlr:

What do all these words have in common?

  • COOK
  • THIN
  • BINS
  • MOCK
  • SCAD
  • LOAN
  • MAID
  • CULTS

(Hint: There may be a few more words that can be added to this list.)

Okay maybe this was harder than I expected.

1 of 2